You are encouraged to reserve classes online and you do not need a credit card to do so.

However, you may also call to reserve your classes. (Registration and reserving a class are the same thing.)

Call 621-3551 and leave your name & phone number. An office volunteer will return your call and help you.

Bridge Fall 2020

Instructor: Listed with each lecture below

TBA • 9/17-10/29 • TBA

Class size 5-50 students
Location: Zoom
SEPT 17:  KATAHDIN WOODS AND WATERS NATIONAL MONUMENT — Ken Olson

Thursday, Sept. 17  •  11:00 AM

KATAHDIN WOODS AND WATERS NATIONAL MONUMENT - Place, Politics, and a Prognosis
Learn about Maine’s new, battled-over National Monument which, like Baxter Park and Acadia, sprang full-blown from private philanthropy, a term meaning “love of humankind in general.”

​Presenter: Ken Olson

Ken Olson, retired President and CEO of Friends of Acadia (Bar Harbor), was Executive Director of The Nature Conservancy of Connecticut, President of American Rivers (Washington, DC), Director of Special Projects at The Conservation Fund (Arlington, VA) and, early in his career, head of the Appalachian Mountain Club Hut System in New Hampshire’s White Mountain National Forest. In 2005 he received Lifetime Achievement Award from the Natural Resources Council of Maine. Ken holds degrees from the University of Maine and Yale and in 2006 was awarded an honorary degree from College of the Atlantic for “outstanding contributions to human ecology.” He lives in Bass Harbor.
SEPT 22:   GOOD WIVES AND SUBTLE WARRIORS — Rebecca Graham

Tuesday, Sept. 22  •  1:00 PM

GOOD WIVES AND SUBTLE WARRIORS:
Finding Maine’s Early Frontier Women
will examine the not-so-subtle power of the Scots-Irish women in Maine and NH whose resistance to authority, economic diversification and indigenous cooperation created peace zones around one frontier town.

Presenter: Rebecca Graham

Rebecca Graham is the President of the Maine Ulster Scots Project, joining John Mann in his efforts in 2008 through her archaeological research project on the 1718 Cork Settlement with Barry H. Rodrigue. A graduate of The University of Southern Maine, Ulster University’s Transitional Justice Institute, in Belfast, Northern Ireland, and European Inter-University Centre for Human Rights and Democratisation, Venice Italy, Rebecca works in the area of democratic governance and electoral evaluation internationally, and legislative advocacy in Maine. Her most recent work, 1718-2018; Reflections on 300 years of Scots Irish in Maine, focuses on the legacy, impact, and family stories of this early migration from north of the island of Ireland.
SEPT 24:   SIGN ME UP – COLLECTING AUTOGRAPHS — Mike Bell

Thursday, Sept. 24  •  11:00 AM

SIGN ME UP – COLLECTING AUTOGRAPHS
Looking for a fun hobby that can instantly connect you to history, sports or Hollywood? Autograph collecting is for you. If you have any you want to share, please do.

Presenter: Mike Bell

Mike Bell loves American history! With a Master’s degree in both history and teaching, and an undergrad degree in Political Science; he has enjoyed a varied career in teaching and historical interpretation. Mike appeared on a History Channel special about PT 109 and for over 20 years portrayed many historical figures, including Butch Cassidy and Sam Houston.
SEPT 29 & OCT 1:  NOVA SCOTIA - Our Almost Neighbor — Elizabeth Reinsborough

2 SESSION LECTURE
Part 1: Tuesday, Sept. 29  •  1:00 PM
Part 2: Thursday, Oct. 1  •  11:00 AM

NOVA SCOTIA - Our Almost Neighbor
Nova Scotia contains two National Parks, five World Heritage Sites, beautiful Cape Breton Island, and the vibrant capital of Halifax. Come explore the geography and history of this Canadian maritime province.

​Presenter: Elizabeth Reinsborough

Elizabeth Reinsborough was born in Northern Ireland. She has a Bachelor of Science degree from Queens University, Belfast, a Masters of Science from London University and teaching credentials from the University of Maine. She has worked in a plant breeding program in Tanzania and taught Biology in Maine for 20 years. Elizabeth has traveled extensively both in this country and abroad. She enjoys hiking and for 20 years was a maintainer on the Appalachian Trail in the 100 mile wilderness. She teaches the National Park course for Senior College and often contributes to the lecture series.

 

OCT 8: HISTORY OF THE NOSE IN ART — Peter Rosenberg

Thursday, Oct. 8  •  11:00 AM

HISTORY OF THE NOSE IN ART
A retired Otolaryngologist is also interested in the history of western art. Combining these two, I prepared a lecture on this subject that I presented to the UMASC approximately ten years ago. This lecture and slide show on the history of the nose in art was revised for this special presentation. I know you will enjoy it.

​Presenter: Peter Rosenberg

Peter Rosenberg is a retired Otolaryngologist who was educated at Clinton Grade School, Poughkeepsie High School, Princeton University, Tufts Medical School and Walter Reed Army Medical Center. He practiced ENT at Fort Bragg, solo in Norwich CT, and at the Togus Veterans Administration Hospital. His wide range of activities include playing piano, golf, tennis, bridge, model boats, stained glass and teaching at UMASC.
OCT 13:  THE ROBBER AND THE SCALAWAG— Tom Feagin

Tuesday, Oct. 13  •  1:00 PM

THE ROBBER AND THE SCALAWAG
My great-grandfather, an Alabama preacher and storekeeper during the Civil War, was not a rebel. After the war, as a Republican, he was postmaster. Another postal worker, General Andrew Spurling of the 2nd Maine Cavalry, won the Medal of Honor the day before he stole 700 pounds of chewing tobacco and 18 barrels of flour from my ancestor. Who would think it?

Presenters: Tom Feagin

Tom Feagin  After a stint in the US Public Health Service, Tom Feagin practiced in Augusta, New Orleans and Memphis, gradually shifting from internal medicine to geriatrics to hospice care. He became progressively more interested in doctor-patient communication and end-of-life decision-making over a period of 33 years, and is proud to have founded the Mid-south Center for Biomedical Ethics. He retired in 2004, moved back to Maine, and is concerned about the future of our health-care system.
OCT 15:  ICE HARVESTING — Art Ray

Thursday, Oct. 15  •  11:00 AM

ICE HARVESTING
Maine was a leading “Ice Harvester” in the late 1800’s with 90% going to other states and countries.  This program discusses an era from 1870’s to 1920’s when ice was harvested mainly on the Kennebec River. The Electrical Age (1920’s and refrigerators) put Maine’s 2nd largest harvest out of business.

Presenters: Art Ray

Art Ray is a graduate of the University of Maine in electrical engineering and retired after 35 years at CMP. A student of UMASC since Fall 2003. Art does PowerPoint lectures on art and Maine local history for the Granite Hill/Brown Bag programs.
OCT 20:  INK A DINK A BOTTLE OF INK — Andrea Ostrofsky

Tuesday, Oct. 20  •  1:00 PM

INK A DINK A BOTTLE OF INK - The Story of Oak Gall Ink
Oak gall ink was the common ink of the middle ages. It was used by medieval monks, Leonardo da Vinci, and writers of the Declaration of Independence. We’ll consider its interesting ingredients (what is an oak gall, anyway) and the history of its use, focusing on some notable examples. We’ll cover 2000 years, including 21st-century use and issues.

Presenters: Andrea Ostrofsky

Andrea Ostrofsky lived in New Jersey, New Hampshire, Oregon, and Nebraska, and in Maine for 38 years.  Her background is in the biological sciences.  She has worked in laboratories studying wood decay fungi for the USDA Forest Service and for the University of Maine.  After moving to Augusta in 2006, Andrea began volunteer work at the Maine State Museum and working in the library at Cony High School for 9 years before retiring. Currently she is enjoying UMA Senior College.
OCT 22:  BEES OF MAINE: BIOLOGY AND CONSERVATION STATUS — Frank Drummond

Thursday, Oct. 22  •  11:00 AM

BEES OF MAINE: Biology and Conservation Status
Bees are under threat of extinction throughout the world. Are the bees experiencing similar declines in Maine? This question will be discussed and how citizens, businesses and governments can make a difference.

Presenters: Frank Drummond

Dr. Francis “Frank” Drummond is widely recognized as the personification of the University of Maine’s land-grant mission. Frank, a gifted teacher and an internationally respected scholar, is a professor in the university’s School of Biology and Ecology and a faculty member with Cooperative Extension. His current research is focused on four topics, all of significant relevance to Maine’s economy: the ecology and population genetics of wild blueberry plants; factors that affect plant pollination; blueberry plant production; and the ecological and physiological effects that herbivores have on fruit production.
OCT 27 & 29:  UNESCO WORLD HERITAGE SITES IN EUROPE — Elizabeth Reinsborough

2 SESSION LECTURE
Part 1: Tuesday, Oct. 27  •  1:00 PM
Part 2: Thursday, Oct. 29  •  11:00 AM

UNESCO WORLD HERITAGE SITES IN EUROPE
Even though Europe is the second smallest continent, it has over 400 UNESCO sites. This 2-part class will be a brief introd
uction to some of the major sites in Europe that UNESCO has declared are of cultural or scenic significance and should be protected for all of humanity.

Presenters: Elizabeth Reinsborough

Elizabeth Reinsborough was born in Northern Ireland. She has a Bachelor of Science degree from Queens University, Belfast, a Masters of Science from London University and teaching credentials from the University of Maine. She has worked in a plant breeding program in Tanzania and taught Biology in Maine for 20 years. Elizabeth has traveled extensively both in this country and abroad. She enjoys hiking and for 20 years was a maintainer on the Appalachian Trail in the 100 mile wilderness. She teaches the National Park course for Senior College and often contributes to the lecture series.